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Gold is a drag, healthcare not so, then there’s Apple

By Dian Vujovich

For everyone who has been hoping gold would be the golden egg in their investment portfolios the news isn’t good: The precious metal’s price has been on a downward price spiral for more than five years. On the other hand, it’s three-cheers for health care ETFs and holy mackerel is Apple rich.

First, some commodity and dollar news.

Gold is dangling around its 5-year low with Spot Gold closing today at $1,102.72, according to Bloomberg. WTI Crude oil is cheap too, closing at $50.45. And then there’s the dollar: still strong against the euro at $1.09 reminding traveling investors that’s there’s still value in crossing the pond.

As for exchange-traded funds, ETFs, the Bespoke Investment Group reported that over the last three years, the US Health Care ETF (NYSEARCA:XLV) gained the most. It was up 101.5 percent, sans dividends.

Then there is Apple (AAPL). Sure iPad sales aren’t as great as some would like and who knows what’s really up with desktops. But iPhone sales are still really hot: At the end of June, their sales were up 35 percent from a year ago, according to YahooFinance.

Even though the stock closed a couple of bucks a share lower today, 7/21/15, than where it had opened. $132.92 and $130.75, respectfully, the company has more money than most of us can imagine.

And to that end. Sarah Whitten wrote a great piece for CNBC.com titled, “Just how much cash does Apple have?’ that’s worth a read. Here are some of what she writes Apple’s total cash is the equivalent of:

•”The market cap of Disney.

•The GDP of the Czech Republic.

•Nearly 184.5 million ounces of gold (with gold approximately at $1,100 an ounce)—more than all the gold in Fort Knox.

• Two-hundred-seventy separate trips to the moon.

•The total net-worth of Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Mark Zuckerberg, and Jack Ma combined. “

Although that last one sounds like a lot of money, this one really doesn’t: “Handing each person in the United States a check for $632.”

Bummer, I was hoping it would be more.


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